writing rengeek magpie mind

November 2014

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criminal minds reid mathematics

please please please let me get what i want


I'm going to tell you my favorite clean joke. It goes like this:

In the rest of the world, when they say Yankee, they mean somebody from North America. In North America, when they say Yankee, they mean somebody from the USA. In the USA, when they say Yankee, they mean somebody from above the Mason-Dixon line. Above the Mason-Dixon line, when they say Yankee, they mean somebody who lives in the Northeast. In the Northeast, when they say Yankee (if they're not talking about the sportsball team) they mean somebody from New England.

And in New England, when they say Yankee, they mean somebody who eats pie for breakfast.

I eat pie for breakfast.

When I celebrated my first Thanksgiving in Las Vegas in 1999, the single thing that made me most homesick for New England was the pie. You see, here in the Northeast, pie is made of fruit or vegetables or both (strawberry rhubarb, mmm) or sometimes meat and vegetables and gravy (chicken pot pie, mm...) and it's baked in a pastry crust. Confronted with a chocolate cream pie made with instant pudding and a crust of crushed up Oreos...

I'm sure it's very nice.

But it's not pi.

We're having pumpkin and bumbleberry pi tonight. What are you having?

In any case, the Boskone Blog is celebrating Pi Day with recipes and anecdotes, including one from me. Why not head over there and check it out?

Comments

I found saskatoon pie - my absolute favourite, and I never find it in the store, but I found one today, and it was the last one, and I'm eating it tonight after stirfry.
What is it??
What's saskatoon pie? Saskatoons are a berry - they look like blueberries, but a lot smaller, the bushes they grow on are taller, and they taste different from blueberries. They don't seem to be cultivated on the same scale as blueberries, so it's a lot harder to find them, but you can usually find saskatoon jam in stores. I dunno, maybe it's more common in Canada. :P
I've never even heard of them. *g*
Never thought about it before, they're native to my area, the Canadian prairies, so they might be a lot more common around here. You can find them growing wild here sometimes. Just checked wikipedia, and they're not native to new england, or really anywhere near you. They're really awesome though, if you ever see saskatoon jam in the grocery store, try it out :)
Roger. *g*