writing rengeek magpie mind

December 2014

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spies mfu goodliest outside napoleon

bring me your lovely light. i'll be your satellite.

I totally just did a tripod headstand with no spotter and no wall. This physical fitness thing is really awesome.




(Scott took the photo. Because he is tolerant. And he's been spotting me since last year some time while I practiced. He is a patient soul.)

I have not been this geeked about a yoga accomplishment since wheel pose. (Proper crow was pretty exciting too, I admit. And handstands, even though I still use a wall and cheat to get up. And bound side angle. But wheel was the best! And so is this. Exhilarating. Success, when you have worked for it, is the greatest thing in the world.)

You practice and practice and accept that you're never going to get it and you fall over a lot and then one day it happens and it's actually easy. Easy-ish. Easier than you expected. Much easier than the practicing made it seem like it would be.

I was thirty years old before I learned how to learn things. Nobody has ever taught me. Either I could do things or I couldn't, and there was never anybody who explained to me that no, you have to study. You have to fail. And keep failing better (and trying different things and researching and stuff) until you're not failing any more.

It was writing novels that taught me this, by the way. Because I never could. And then eventually I just kept trying long enough and did. Then I wrote four more, and sold one.

Reader, I had an epiphany. Stuff doesn't just happen or not happen. I mean, some of it does. But some of it happens because you keep doing hard things long enough to learn the knack of it, and then it's less hard.

Writing novels is exactly the same thing as running thirteen miles, or doing a headstand, or learning how to cook.

And I'm better at this stuff at 41 than I was at 14. It's amazing how useful it is to know how to learn things.

Also, damn, have I got some spinal erectors going on. Let's hear it for deadlifts, boys and girls.

Now to work on my form.

Comments

Oh, well done!
Congratulations. Looking good.
Impressive!
Go you!

I was thirty years old before I learned how to learn things. Nobody has ever taught me. Either I could do things or I couldn't, and there was never anybody who explained to me that no, you have to study. You have to fail. And keep failing better (and trying different things and researching and stuff) until you're not failing any more.

THIS. Knitting was the thing that taught me this.
It's amazing how well it works, too. It's just slow.

Why don't they teach this in schools?
My kid (15 now, eee) is one of those "smart enough to get it right, blow it off if not" and I literally had to teach him how to study/learn. They certainly did not teach it in his schools.

One main thing from a parenting perspective was to praise effort, even when failing, over results. HUGE difference.
And recognize work over talent, yeah.
We try to teach it in schools (or, at least I try). The kids tune it out.

The jury is out as to whether my students from this past year will ever come back to me and say "You know, you were right about writing and studying all all that stuff..." I tried, by all the stars above did I ever try.
wow. You inspire me, Bear, as a fellow fat girl who loves yoga...
Go get 'em, tiger. *g*
I have the opposite learning going on now: I could always do a backbend (I call them that because I learned it in little-kid tumbling and then gymnastics rather than yoga) and learned to do a headstand on my own at, oh, 9 or so. So I don't really remember not being able to do them. Now I don't, though, and it turns out that I no longer have the back flexibility for a backbend, and while I can still kick up to a handstand, it hurts my wrists too much. (I can still do a headstand, though.) So to continue your practice metaphor, stuff happens because you keep doing hard things long enough to learn the knack of it, and then in many cases it keeps happening only because you keep practicing that knack.

(Not that that would help the wrist issue, though. Sometimes you just accrue injuries.)
I injured my wrists (apparently) doing an impromptu handstand at 30-mumble a couple of years ago. They still twinge, so I'm both hoping your success and curious what to do to avoid further injury in the future.
Yeehaw! Congratulations!

(Just wait until you get a few more years going...for me, the forties was when I could Do Stuff physically I had no hope of doing when I was younger. I'd be willing to bet that will be the case for you, too--the forties rule! Well, the fifties do, but differently...)
I am impressed, and no little bit jealous - my BP is so low on a normal day that I'm likely to pass out if I try a headstand. :-(
Do you know if cardiovascular exercise helps with things like postural hypotension and all that? I've heard conflicting things.
My experience was that the more I did, the more my body just adjusted. My blood pressure decided to drop from 120/70 to 100/60 a few years back, which was kind of exciting. There was a while where certain position changes had me seeing stars or even things briefly going dark... but keeping going helped.
No idea.

(My BP on a good day is about 90/60. The one time they tried to test it after taking blood, I was on a scale of dead. That was...amusing.)
Heh. My mother-in-law apparently got all the way up to "normal" during childbirth. At one point, she got in a car crash and had to assure the EMTs that she wasn't going into shock -- that actually WAS her usual blood pressure.
When I was on meds, I did acclimate after a while.

Jesus God, lady! You're trying to make the rest of us look bad!
Naw. She's just making HER look GOOD. The rest of us can look good or bad on our own; it's not a zero-sum game.

She's added to the level of awesome in the world, which in no way takes away from the level of awesome you, or I, add to the world.
D'aw.

You are indeed both awesome.
Rock the fuck on, you.

I look forward to when wheel isn't HA HA HA NO for me. And when crow isn't three seconds of NOT THE FACE NOT THE FACE
The trick that taught me wheel was when my instructor told me to stop pushing with my arms and pull with my hips. It's all core.

I'm not sure Crow is EVER not the face not the face.
I may have had an epiphany - cranky shoulders and floppy wrists dictate getting my hands about six inches further diagonally from my ears than is "correct" at which point, I can do wheel. kind of. without enough arch in my thoracic spine. but at least my head comes up!
woot!
I was able to do Crow when I was a little kid. It was a heck of a lot of fun back then.

It's a little more terrifying now...
Oh, and that icon? Beautiful.
Cool! Quilting was my a-ha moment in this regard. It's amazing how much making a bed-sized quilt and writing a novel have in common. Especially if you hand quilt.
I think writing novels gave me the skills I needed to run a half-marathon.

You just get up and do whatever you can do that day, picking away at it, and eventually you reach the end.
Yes, this! All of this!

(I remember how absolutely exhilarated I was, the first time I pushed up into Wheel. I do it regularly now, but it never gets old, that wonderful feeling of I can do this.. I'm almost there in Pendulum, and working working working for it with Crane. But it is work, and it's wonderful, and oh so satisfying.)
Awesome! Congrats!
Yay!
Go you!

"I was thirty years old before I learned how to learn things. Nobody has ever taught me. Either I could do things or I couldn't, and there was never anybody who explained to me that no, you have to study. You have to fail. And keep failing better (and trying different things and researching and stuff) until you're not failing any more."

Mostly martial arts for me. Particularly the part where I didn't think I was especially talented* and I kept doing it anyway because I thought it was worthwhile.

* In retrospect, while not untrue, a lot of this was struggling with physical issues.
Woohoo - you look awesome upside-down!

The concept of learning how to learn really resonates with me. I was one of those bright kids at school who didn't have to try too hard and who got praised for achievements, never for effort. Consequently I never persisted at the things I found hard. Now that I'm older, and I find that I really want to be able to do things, I'm okay with trying, failing, trying, failing better etc.

In fact the learning and the failing and the trying is one of the good parts.
I'm trying to convince myself of that, but so far my endocrine system is really certain that the good part is when you finally *get* it. *g*

(One glowering Reid deserves another)

Edited at 2013-06-21 03:29 pm (UTC)
"I was thirty years old before I learned how to learn things. Nobody has ever taught me. Either I could do things or I couldn't, and there was never anybody who explained to me that no, you have to study. You have to fail. And keep failing better (and trying different things and researching and stuff) until you're not failing any more."

Oh god, this is me too. I was brought up to believe that people are good or bad at things and that's that, nothing you can do about. The impact on my education was terrible because I soon decided that I was just "bad" at anything I found difficult!