writing rengeek magpie mind

December 2014

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writing rengeek magpie mind

One marvelously clever thing that was suggested at the "Why is SF so White?" panel, as a means of encouraging more non-white writers into the industry, was a mentoring program. (Liz Scheier, from the audience, also mentioned that she doesn't see nearly enough submissions with non-white protagonists or main characters, and would love to see more.)

The idea being that would-be writers of color could be paired with volunteer authors who would help mentor them.

I am not the person to administrate this. I know this about myself. But I thought it was a good enough idea to be worth sailing out into the zeitgeist.

Comments

Re: I can only speak for myself and pretend to speak for others like myself

I think Asians in America perhaps do not yet feel the luxury of thinking about the arts for a living, nor face the closed doors that lead to a desperation to escape via the arts. Trapped by the "model minority" myth.

I thought, when I was younger, and there wasn't yet a flood of Asian American women's experience novels (sparked by Amy Tan), that I might write some sort of pseudo-biography. Writing about F&SF seemed frivolous to me in the face of being misunderstood *now* - but I think if I'd known about Chip Delaney when I was younger, I would have seen it differently. Or maybe not - it seemed somehow when I saw Octavia Butler and Chip Delaney and other black American writers of F&SF that it was a black/white thing, and once again something where being Asian left one out.