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bear by san

August 2015

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bear by san

One marvelously clever thing that was suggested at the "Why is SF so White?" panel, as a means of encouraging more non-white writers into the industry, was a mentoring program. (Liz Scheier, from the audience, also mentioned that she doesn't see nearly enough submissions with non-white protagonists or main characters, and would love to see more.)

The idea being that would-be writers of color could be paired with volunteer authors who would help mentor them.

I am not the person to administrate this. I know this about myself. But I thought it was a good enough idea to be worth sailing out into the zeitgeist.

Comments

And when race matters to white people, to stamp it out.

I am confused. matociquala's own post was about race, which matters to her, a white person. Who is trying to stamp that out? People like Pam Noles? I don't see it.

Encouraging race to be important anywhere

I'm not sure I understand the equation you're making between acknowledging in fiction that non-white people exist and "encouraging race to be important".
And when race matters to white people, to stamp it out.

That particular sentence was vague, I admit. What I meant was that people are trying to stamp out skin-color-as-identity in white people (the Klan being a far extreme of this) but encourage it in black people.

I'm not sure I understand the equation you're making between acknowledging in fiction that non-white people exist and "encouraging race to be important"

What I'm saying, I guess, is that having a double standard, even if there are good reasons for it, causes more problems in the long run than it solves. I'm happy to see non-white people in SF/F; being drawn out of myself is why I read fiction. But I reject Noles's reading of ordinary, racially unspecified characters as "generic white" because they're not specified as being otherwise. If she can't imagine them with dark skins, that's her problem, not the writer's.