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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

well i don't know if i'm wrong because she's only just gone

I figured out how to describe what I'm trying to do with my art this morning. In an email to another writer, I typed:

I don't write consolatory literature. I write absolutionary literature.

And then I paused and stared at what I had just written. And it clicked in my head as solidly as something somebody mentioned at Boskone, I think it was, that other people write comedies of manners, and New Englanders write comedies of ethics.

Because I do write comedies of ethics.

And the thing about absolution is you have to earn it.

And now that this moment of self-absorbtion has passed, back to reading this horribly written book, which I shall tell you all about a little later.

Comments

I don't write consolatory literature. I write absolutionary literature.

I think this relates to our early formative experiences as readers/viewers, interacting with our family, community, art. I geek over redemption as a theme, credit due to hardline parents, finding out I was adopted at an early age, and many years of Catholic school. Set me up to either love of hate stories like A Christmas Carol.

So, I either write stories where people end up damned by their actions, placing themselves in a position where they need redemption, or where people need to go through some sort of hell to reach that redemption.

I can see ethics as a New Englander theme. Harks back to the colonial days, I would guess. And you either buy into it or you don't. And you're allowed, as a writer, as a creative person, to present examples of both extremes and everything in between.
Yes. I think so.