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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

You can't sheep a man who was born to hang.

Hanged for a lamb, hanged for...

a ewe.
33(12.5%)
an ewe.
20(7.6%)
a sheep.
63(24.0%)
many sheeps.
3(1.1%)
mmm. mutton.
17(6.5%)
wooly ticky.
10(3.8%)
black-faced ticky.
14(5.3%)
What was the question?
22(8.4%)

Comments

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baa

Re: baa

I agree, none of the options really sounded right with the phrase turned around back to front, so I voted ticky. Now if only I could have done so on certain previous elections...
Baah! Humbug.
There was no option for curry goat. :(
I'm with bifemmefatale - "one might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb". I was reading the choices, thinking "hanged for a lamb, hanged for a sheep" just doesn't have the same ring. I think the reason it tempts my brain is due to the saying "in for a penny, in for a pound". but then, there is "penny-wise and pound-foolish". :D
my mom's vote is for "better to hang for a sheep than a lamb".
I learned it as "hanged for a sheep, hanged for a goat" - I think that's taken the original saying and conflated it with something or other biblical that I can't remember.
...the men they couldn't hang?
I know it's not even close to right, but I voted for 'wooly ticky' because it's fun to say. Wooly ticky!

I'm such a child sometimes.
Definitely not *an ewe. *shudder*
I've always heard it as "Might as well hang for a sheep as a goat."
Sorry, I'm distracted by all that yaaaaaaarn.

(what zombie knitters say, you know.)
Mmmm... lamb...

Hey, WTF? They’re making the Maharaja Mac with chicken now!

"It's Hang-ed for a sheep or murder in the first degree."
Your money or your life she said, it's all the same to me.
I'd always heard it as, "May as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb," meaning, "Steal big."
Yep, me too.

and you're not going to believe this

The proper answer was not provided.

Might as well be hanged for a buck as a lamb.

btw "an ewe" cracked me up
In the UK it is certainly "might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb".
The other way round it's a sheep, but I think "a ewe" sounds better when it's that way round.
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