?

Log in

No account? Create an account
bear by san

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
atc

i could have died from being boring

I decided that tonight, I was in a really good mood, and there were a whole bunch of new unrated routes that looked like they might even be doable, so I gave myself permission to suck and try all sorts of things I wasn't sure I could do.

I think this means I'm officially working on 5.8s and 5.9s now, because I couldn't do any of them, and my hands are totally shralped from trying. Raw and painful, even. I did, however, at least get on all of them, and in a couple of cases I made several moves. (One, I got a third of: another I got half, with a lot of thrashing.)

However, my elbow is working better, and so is my finger (something to be said for support gear).

I think my tired from last week was calorie deficit, which means I need to schedule things so my heavy eating days are also my climbing days.

Good news, however, is that both my cardio condition and my strength are such that I don't get tired climbing anymore. I do get pumped, which is a technical meaning my forearms and hands are the fuck out of glucose and oxygen and don't work anymore, thank you (seriously, this is intense exercise), but there's not the lactic acid burn or the cardiovascular exhaustion, except in the immediate aftermath of extreme anaerobic exertion when one lies on the floor and pants until one's blood re-oxygenates.

Comments

Hmm..I hadn't heard of the "pumped" thing. This might explain some of the issues I have been having when training for the triathlon I want to do. I was assuming it was all because of my insulin dependence but maybe not. Do you think swimming in the ocean for a long time could have the same effect?
I think long-term exercise tiredness is more likely to be lactic acid buildup, but I'm not an exercise physiologist.

What you get with climbing is repeated short-duration peak exertion, alternated with more moderate strength work (holding yourself on the wall) and it just wears your hands and forearms out like nothing I've ever done. You don't even necessarily get the lactic acid burn thing or any sense of tiredness. The muscle fibers just quit working: you say *go!* and there is no go to be had.
OK, that's not what is happening with the endurance stuff. It must be an odd feeling at first.

I've decided to climb anyway and signed up for a class to learn the basics. If I let the docs curtail everything they wanted I'd never do anything fun. My daughter has such a great time and workout doing this and reading your entries about it sound so enticing I figure it's worth at least learning.
*nod*

With long term endurance stuff, you may be running out of available fuel--some sugars are stored in your muscles for immediate use: when they're gone, they have to be replaced from elsewhere.

I haven't the foggiest how this intersects with diabetes. You might want to talk to an expert. There are enough diabetic athletes that the information has to be out there.
I do get pumped, which is a technical meaning my forearms and hands are the fuck out of glucose and oxygen and don't work anymore, thank you (seriously, this is intense exercise), but there's not the lactic acid burn or the cardiovascular exhaustion,

Oh hey, there's a term for that? I always thought I was the only one. Cool!
It's common!
This feels like it should lead into a musical number.

"It's common!"

"Unremarkable!"

"Uncontroversial!"

"Practically universal!"

(all singing, barbershop-style) "PUMPED-OUT CLIMBERS' LIMBS!"

And then there's a song-and-dance number about eating enough before you go climbing. :-)
um. win.