August 13th, 2007

spies mfu ispy he died _ hawleygriffen

patience, rewarded.


For those of you who were following the Serendipitous Kitty Saga in 2005, concerning kit_kindred and my attempts to tame a pair of feral kittens--he's finally succeeded in trapping the female (Napoleon), and her two current babies. (Whom he hereby dubs Kelly and Scotty.)

Huzzah! 

The spy kitties have been rescued! Neutering and/or spaying and attempts at adoption to follow...



Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my pillow.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*
Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my comforter.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*
Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my pillow.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*
Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my featherbed.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*
Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my pillow.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*
Cat: Monkey, roll over, you're on my blanket.
Monkey: Mur? *rolls over*

[time passes]

Monkey: Cat, get up, it's time for breakfast.
Cat: No thank you, monkey. I'm too comfy to get up yet.
Monkey: Suit yourself. Man, my neck hurts, and I don't feel like I slept at all. I wonder why that is?

writing whiskey soul

heaven help the devil may he have a few unpleasant memories

Some bloggers review Whiskey & Water:

Swarm Of Beasts here.

The most interesting thing about this novel, to me, is that it has a number of things that ordinarily would push all my buttons and make me go squee. Like sexy devils! And sexy angels! And sexy Kit Marlowe! And cute gothy people! And then-- it turns around and stays too honest and dark and brutal to actually make me go squee. It's not even the turned-up melodrama of everybody dying beautiful tragic deaths; it's something quieter than that, and harsher in its own way.

Russ Allbery here:

Bear doesn't have quite the touch with multicornered politics between Heaven, Hell, and other powers that Neil Gaiman has, but I found her take quite satisfying. The twist she brings to Hell that I haven't seen done before is to take several major literary conceptions of the Devil (Milton's, Marlowe's, etc.) and populate Hell with them, as rivals and occasional allies. It's more satisfying than the normal picture of one Satan and his subservient devils and it's a springboard into exploring differing conceptions of evil, rebellion, pride, and outlooks on what Hell and temptation should be. The powers are handled with suitable impressiveness and distinction: tragically impressive physical force, beauty and pride, and devious manipulativeness are all present and have their time in the sun.

Click the links for full reviews. Not very spoilery in either case!

Also, a review at Romantic Times by Natalie A. Luhrs, here, which is brief so I will not quote from it.