?

Log in

No account? Create an account
bear by san

March 2017

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com
bear by san

Kat's still being smart about plot.

I think she's right, in that in some respect, it's again the attempt to categorize that breaks down. Because we have these categorizing brainses, and they don't necessarily do us any good once we get past a certain point in the real world, because the categories are always arbitrary.

It's when we forget that our categories are a convenience and start treating them as natural law that we get into trouble.

Lately, I seem to be moving into a place where I'm less interested in talking about writing, because it becomes more and more plain to me that the ultimate answer to everything is 'it depends. Can you make it work?'

On the one hand, I realize that for many writers (myself included) there's a lot of value to be had in obsessively intellectualizing things and understanding how they work. But on the other hand, at some point, it has to become reflex. Because writing is too hard to do consciously.

I'm also very tired of dealing with people who fetishize for or against some aspect of craft--no present tense! always use first person! no adverbs ever!--which seems to me like an artist who intentionally limits his palette, or who can't abide a fan brush.

I mean, I have a few fetishes of my own. But I try to keep track of the fact that they are fetishes, and not for everybody.

Comments

I agree with you. Everyone's voice is different. The main reason to talk about writing, I think, is to get ideas from other people. Especially people who are wrestling with problems that never occured to me. Or people who have found something that works for a problem I'm having.

The only way to become an expert is to encounter and overcome difficulty. Heh. I like to talk about the things I'm doing and thinking about. A limited audience means people get tired of me thinking out loud about writing anyway. =)
yah to all of that--sometimes one must talk, and sometimes one must do.
I'm also very tired of dealing with people who fetishize for or against some aspect of craft--no present tense! always use first person! no adverbs ever!--which seems to me like an artist who intentionally limits his palette, or who can't abide a fan brush.

Amen. It's a "can't-see-the-forest-for-the-trees" habit. Although it makes me more rebellious than tired. Tch. Bad Kelly, no cookie. *g*
I go through phases where I do and don't want to discuss/analyze the craft of writing. At the moment, it's at the point where I've gaifiated from one workshop, because overintellectualizing was getting in the way of writing.

For all arts, there are conventions and rules of thumb and good advice. There are no rules.

---L.
The analyzing side of writing seems to me to be a lot like learning new movements: at first one has to concentrate on where each foot must be, where the hands, what is the rhythm, what moves where when, but at some point it all locks together, the body knows what to do, the mind cuts free and listens to the music. And one can dance.

And, later, one becomes restless, and wants to learn a new dance, and the process begins yet again, but maybe a bit easier to assimilate each step.
Yes, I think so.