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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

I would be happy just to hold the hands I love--

There. Finally, some draft accomplished today.

1300 new words on Worldwired, bringing me to page 22 of 30. Jenny just came up with a crazy-ass idea, which reminds me why I sign her paychecks. She may not be sane or cautious, but she hates to sit still, and that does keep a book interesting.

Next POV: Richard/Alan, Ghost In The Machine. But not, I think, today, Dr. Feynman.

Something tells me I'm unlikely to actually have this draft done by June 30th, since I'm averaging 1250 words a day so far, and I would need to do closer to 2200, because of missing about fifteen days' worth of May and June due to travel. But that's okay; I'm one-fourteenth done. Which somehow seems like much, much more than saying I have about 6250 words. *g*

Which is fine, really. June 30th isn't a hard deadline--it's a get-your-ass-in-gear-Bear goal. At least that thing is happening, that wonderful thing where I can feel the shape of the book coalescing in my brain and its developing a weight and a presence and an outline, and those things that mcurry and arcaedia laugh like drains at me for when I try to describe them by drawing voluptuous curves in midair with my hands.

Well, dammit. Stories do have shapes. Which is why really serious hardcore rewriting can be so hard for me, because I can feel the shape of a story in my head when I'm writing it, and it becomes an exercise in uncovering that shape, showing it to best advantage, finding the elephant in the stone and polishing it up. But rewriting a finished story (beyond adding, subtracting ,shining, polishing, taking new angles on it) is like grinding the statue down, mixing it with mortar, and shaping it into a camel.

And every book is different, and every book is about finding a different path, and feeling out a different shape.

And that's, you know. Cool. *g* Hard work. But cool.

Comments

Yes! Exactly! I'd recently discovered that outlines had shape, but didn't go far enough to apply that to stories as well. I've got a story that needs to be shaped like waves, and instead it's got a linear shape and it's driving me crazy, because I don't know how to grind it down and reshape it.

Yes, it's like creating bonsai trees. You can do a lot of shaping when it's younger, but trying to radically reshape it after a certain age is... perilous.

Cool, thank you for that insight.
Well, for me, the reshaping can be done--in many cases *must* be done--but it's brutal, brutal work. In some cases I think it would be easier to scrap everything and start over, except I seem constitutionally unable to do that.

There's a lot of jiggling that goes on in early days, too, to get the story to fall into shape. Sort of tapping it through the screen....
My books feel like rocks in my head, too, but I'm not usually carving them into elephants. The shapes are always more abstract. My first novel, for example, is egg-shaped lapis.

The current project was supposed to have a narrow join in the middle. That was too fragile to hold, so now I have to polish that bit down so it doesn't have a jaggedy bit sticking off each one.

Definitely, definitely shapes.
...nod. And when I do heavy revisions, I can no longer *feel* the book, whick means that I'm flying blind, and because I can't feel the story arc--I think it's much like what dolphins must experience, with sonar, the shape of the story in my head--I am convinced the book is ass and I can no longer see things like weak transitions, etc.

Which makes the book feel very, very *bad,* because it feels like it's not jelling.
Mine mostly feel solid, except when they're being melted out of ice. But major revisions feel like making a huge cut into a block of marble: I'm afraid I'm cutting off something desperately necessary that won't be reattachable at all at all.
At least that thing is happening, that wonderful thing where I can feel the shape of the book coalescing in my brain and its developing a weight and a presence and an outline, and those things that mcurry and arcaedia laugh like drains at me for when I try to describe them by drawing voluptuous curves in midair with my hands.

Yes, but I think it was a fond sort of "those crazy writers" laughing. *grin*

Of course stories have shapes. And if the end doesn't have a bend downward just so it doesn't close satisfactorily.

---L.