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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

You know, I've spent two books giving my characters problems-- and now I have no idea how I'm going to resolve all those problems in just 400 pages.

And currently, I have 11,000 words of mostly just people standing around talking about how screwed they are.

I wonder if I can pull off an entire book of that:.

"Hey, Jock. We're buggered, dontcha know?"

"Yeah, Chris, I hear those other guys are really fucked as well."

"Fuck this for a lark."

"Let's go bowling."

--exeunt, pursued by a Bear--

***

Actually, despite the day kind of getting away from me, I got 1350 words and a complete scene today, even if it is just people talking about how buggered they are. (And how did sex get to be a metaphor for unpleasantness, anyway?)

And I figured out where and how the book ends, which is always a very good sign.

Comments

Timprov: "There's a Coen bros. movie with that plot, and people seem to like it."

Just me now: I spent about a semester trying to convince people to use "celibate" where "fucked" would usually have gone. "We have a Mechanics test tomorrow? Oh, man, I am sooooo celibate!"

It did not work. Perhaps it would have worked better if I had been around another female, like, ever.

Jen The World's Best Lab Partner and I also tried to get people to substitute sex organs where appropriate. "She went right up and said that to his face? Man, that takes ovaries!" Also did not catch on. I started that one with "tits," but Jen TWBLP pointed out that if it took tits, she, for one, was out of the running.
*choke*

I like the celibate thing.

'ovaries' got used pretty frequently around my dorm. Even with regard to men. *g*
Well, it depends on if it's, you know, rape, or consensual, of course.

But then again, rape isn't sex.

and I think we're buggering off into semantics...
In the immortal words of Stephen King, "fuck gerunds"
**mostly just people standing around talking about how screwed they are** Well, it can help them examine their options. Like bowling. =)

Writing is like breaking things. So easy to destroy (create problems), not quite as easy to fix (solve problem)
Good to know I'm not the only one who finds breaking characters and their lives so much easier than putting them back together again. :-)

Sez who?

Who says you gotta FIX all those problems by the end of the book?

Good luck. :)

Re: Sez who?

Good point. I do like books where people are so thoroughly buggered that not everything can be put right.

Re: Sez who?

Heh. The day I fix half my character's problems by the end of the book is the day I start writing category romance.

But readers will whine if you don't provide some kind of closure.
(And how did sex get to be a metaphor for unpleasantness, anyway?)
The origin of a lot of these usages (although they're now pretty generalised) seems to be about 'normal' men imagining themselves into a 'feminised' or at least, 'done-unto' - nonconsensually and painfully - position. Which says a rather horrible lot about how some men perceive/d sex. There is a grim article 'Enacting Masculinity: Antigay Violence and Group Rape as Participatory Theater' by Karen Franklin in the online journal Sexuality Research and Social Policy, available here, which makes a particular gruesome point that in the cases involved it doesn't seem to have been about even the perpetrators' pleasure, but about asserting dominance, enacting dominant masculinity, etc.
this is gonna hurt me more than it hurts you. This is for your own good.

So something like mounting behavior in animals, only more so?

eeech.

The last story I did, I got totally stuck at the end (before I wrote it) because I couldn't figure out how to have a satisfying ending. The main character could sell out for a sort of happy ending, or it could be a tragedy. How to pull a twist that makes things turn out so the reader has a satisfying read AND I don't compromise any of my characters? Took me a couple weeks to figure that out. I'm just glad I worked it out before I started writing.
And another one of those writing style things--anything longer than a very brief short, I can't figure out the solution before I start writing. (The resolution is different; I usually know how that will happen.)

This is because my writing style is in large part to start with a group of characters with problems, complicate the hell out of their lives until *I* can't see a clear way out, and then hand them machetes and stand back, and see what happens.

And yet I somehow do this while having a pretty good idea of how the story ends and what the major peak points are. The subconscious is a weird and wunnerful thing.
This is because my writing style is in large part to start with a group of characters with problems, complicate the hell out of their lives until *I* can't see a clear way out, and then hand them machetes and stand back, and see what happens.

I work that way, too. Seems to work.

---L.