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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

Words Microsoft Word did not know before today:

catamite (it knew 'sodomite,' oddly enough)
buggered
rakehell
musky
murrey
rechat
baldric
galleried
supplanter
Peaseblossom
tenné
welcomely
atomies
mousing
ruched
nevermind
coffered
sledged
bentwood
bumroll
(but it knew 'farthingale')
spraddled
geas
kilted
swive
eldritch
peridot



Okay, I refuse to believe the stinking program doesn't know 'coffered.'

Why, yes. I am standardizing the Elizabethan spellings in the epigrams I used as chapter-headers in The Stratford Man. How did you guess?

It knew haulage, though. Will wonders never cease?

I'm going to be arrested for contributing to the deliquency of a computer program any day now.

Comments

It's just as bad if you have the nerve to work with 'alien' languages or other made-up words. I used to try to keep separate Word dictionary files for each 'universe' (which would often contain multiple languages), but I lost those a few updates ago and so tossed everything into one file.
trews
Those are fine, fine words. Are you writing about heraldry? (I've never seen tenne or murrey in any other context.)
*g* I'm spellchecking a novel set in Elizabeth's London. I've also got inciannomati, but I didn't expect it to know that one. *g*
I loved the catamite/sodomite thing.

That just made me larf and larf and larf.
gunnels
ifrit
I wonder if the British English version has buggered and arsehole? All in all, I'm often astonished at the words that MS Word fails to recognize. Particularly when it gets one tense of a verb but not a different one. *shakes head*
Yes, it does, and rakehell, arsehole and eldritch. And I've just ran the test on the computer at work, so they're not words I've added to the custom dictionary and then forgotten that I did it.

Obviously Microsoft expects us Brits to use more colourful and archaic langauge than you USians. *g*
It doesn't know rakehell, baldric, or eldritch? (Just checked, and sure enough, it doesn't.) Sheesh.

Also goes to show I've never used those words and had to add them to the spellchecker. Wait, I have used 'baldric', but I compose in a text editor, and don't put stuff into Word until it's time for a final proof. I fully intend to use 'rakehell', some day. 'Eldritch' has always struck me as a word too colorful for its own good.

And you can't use a catamite, *I'm* using a catamite -- kept by the Grand Inquisitor of Philadelphia -- in my next story. Dibs on the catamite.
I like "eldritch." Perhaps too much. It's one of those words I have to limit myself to using only once per year.

And I'm afraid, suddenly, I seem to have rather a lot of catamites. You start off with one or two, you know, and suddenly there's homoeroticism everywhere. ("Homoneuroticism is the new black!")

But I suspect there's enough go around.
Ingle?
I discovered tonight that Word/Office didn't even know emic or etic, both coined in 1954.

Found your journal because you were the only other person with "Ia! Ia!" in their interests, by the way. And now I wanna do this picture game community thing. Thanks!
Ia! Ia!

Yessss, thus begin all things lean and athirst....

Come on in. *g*

And the picture game thing is very cool.

We should post something.

Hmmm.
Believe it or not, "Trekkie" isn't in there, either. However, "Trekker" is, so I suspect that the manager overseeing the dictionary was my high school journalism teacher. (She had a major problem with the word "Trekkie", too. She hasn't talked to me ever since I popularized the term "Cat Piss Man".)
There's a use of trekker outside of fandom, though -- one who goes on treks.

---L.
My favorite new word (that I used today in fun) is "rilling". It's the sound a small stream makes when passing through an idyllic country scene.
Amazon finally delivered (without the Sandman volume, too, so they could just as well have sent it back in the beginning, but nevermind), so I finally have Hammered. And started it, even. (Though honesty compells me to say the book that kept me up late last night was Sara Ryan's Empress of the World, which rocked.)

---L.
See? That's good. I'd hate to disturb your rest. *g*