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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

It's Christmas time again; it's time to be nice to the people you can't stand all year.

So what is the technical difference between stromboli and calzone, anyway? Is it the presence of ricotta in the latter?

And if so, why, when I order a calzone with extra ricotta, hold most of the mozarella, do I get a puddle of melted mozarella with a little bit of bread floating on top?

All right, news blogging after all. I couldn't resist this one.

Via CBS:

"A small bit of news sparked an idea. Amtrak is resuming service on the City of New Orleans. [Arlo Guthrie] said, "well, there's something we can do."

The City of New Orleans train was made famous by a song that Guthrie released in 1972. Now, Guthrie, his family and some of his musician friends are riding the train from Chicago to New Orleans--holding concerts en route-- to raise money for musicians who lost everything to Hurricane
Katrina.

[Guthrie said,] "In our family, singing's one thing. you also have to do something."

The money raised will also purchase instruments and help flood damaged music clubs, many of which did not have insurance.

Usually, road tours with lots of different musicians take many months to get on track. Arlo Guthrie began by sending a mass email to his friends in August, including one [friend] who would not live to see the tour.

Richard Pryor, who died this weekend, helped underwrite the first show.

Willie Nelson will join Guthrie for the finale."

He's got pains in his brains and chimney scars cover his buns.
--Jimmy Buffett, "Ho Ho Ho and a Bottle of Rhum"

You know, I probably have something like seven or eight hours of cynical Christmas music. That cheers me up, irrationally.

Comments

becaue you ordered a calzone in a place that should not be licensed to try and make them. don't do that again if you can help it.

I think the ricotta in the calzone (which is still optional to that dish) and region, are about the only differences between the Stromboli and the Calzone.
This is not a calzone flaw that is limited to only one restaurant, alas, but a Disturbing Trend.

the horror!

Gack!

Come to think on it, I haven't ordered one anywhere in years, partly on the doubt that anyone could make them as well as the U-of-MN neighborhood Italian eatery of my youth. hm.
I love Arlo and this seems like a worthy thing to do. However, the sentence:

"The City of New Orleans train was made famous by a song that Guthrie released in 1972"

--is immediately followed by the gnashing of thousands of Steve Goodman fans' teeth.
Well, technically Guthrie did release it then, even if Goodman wrote it.

From the story Arlo told on the tribute album to Steve Goodman (one of the first things I ever heard on CD, way back when they were new), it sounds like they were on close enough terms that Steve might not have been bothered too much.
Folk-musical history not being an etwork news strong point, amen. At least it doesn't say Guthrie wrote it.

Arlo.net has the lyrics with attribution:

http://www.arlo.net/lyrics/new-orleans.shtml
I went to see Arlo last Christmas when he came here, and before he sang City of New Orleans he told of how he'd come to know it... He'd finished up a night of playing, and he was tired and he wanted to go home. And this guy came up to him (he named the guy, but I forgot the name... I imagine it was Steve Goodman) and said, "Hey, man, I've got this song you really oughtta hear," and Arlo's like, "Man, I'm tired and I just want to go home," and the guy's like, "No, really, it's a great song... Tell you what, you just sit there, and I'll buy you a beer, and you listen to the song..." and Arlo's like, "You're going to pay me with beer to listen to your song? ...Well, alright..."

And then he recognized its excellence immediately, despite poopedness and all.
It is, in point of fact, one hell of a song.

Thank you for the story.
*nods* Yep, exactly what I was going to say. Strombolis are rolled, and calzones are folded. Rolling pretty much knocks out the ability to use ricotta because it would get all oogie in the process.

I haven't always seen ricotta used in calzones -- it depends on the place.
My impression as well. Calzones are pretty loaded with cheese and stromboli are thin with cheese but loaded with ingredients.

Come to PDX sometime, we'll eat at the Flying Pie, home of all that is good in pizza west of the Rockies.

Re: cynical Christmas music

There were carollers singing "Joy to the world! Larouche is here!" on campus this afternoon. It's quite pleasant, as long as you don't talk to them.

(Anonymous)

cynical christmas music!

May I recommend A Scary Little Solstice? It's really, really fun to sing along with, and it's put out by the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society (http://www.cthulhulives.org/toc.html).

Their font cd is good, too. And reasonably priced!

Sharon (mailto:sharonreads@gmail.com)
(... it's beginning to look a lot like fish-men ...)

Re: cynical christmas music!

Got it! *g*