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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

Hey, scalzi, this guy prefers your Neo-Heinlein to mine. (I didn't know I was writing Neo-Heinlein. You learn something new every day.)

Spoilers for the entire Jenny trilogy, including one that's somewhat inaccurate. ([spoiler] makes that particular decision in spite of [spoiler]'s transparent attempt at manipulation, not because of it.)

This is the first time my characters have been accused of being too good, which I kind of enjoy.

Comments

Hmmm.

A slightly condescending, I'm-to-good-for-this, review.
-but at least it's positive a encourages others to try the books.
*g* If it's got a thriller plotline, that's perforce all it does.

A common misconception.

Or, yanno, possibly I'm not as good at this as I like to think.

(Anonymous)

I really liked the "not starting the first one without having the first one close to hand."

*boggle*

That particular inaccurate spoiler is explicitly stated in the book, too. From the character's POV.

But he's so right about the love triangle. It certainly was just there to promote poly, and in no way, shape, or form did it advance the plot or develop characters. [/snark]

More seriously, I don't disagree with the neo-Heinlein comments, as it's hard to write a sci-fi novel (esepcially one that deliberately looks at some conventions of the genre) without at least inadvertently stepping on some of his territory. I'm not just sure it's a term that has any real meaning.
That particular inaccurate spoiler is explicitly stated in the book, too. From the character's POV.

Well, yeah, but if you skimmed that sentence, you could miss it.

But he's so right about the love triangle. It certainly was just there to promote poly, and in no way, shape, or form did it advance the plot or develop characters.

*g* It serves my well-known polyamorous agenda.

Re: Neo-Heinlein.

...you know, when you put it that way, I think that's entirely fair. I don't think of Heinlein as an influence (certainly not the way I think of Zelazny as one, anyway: I'm always finding bits lifted from Roger in my stuff), but there's a ton of SF's history that's completely Heinleinian. And he's one of the more recent authors to really push the trope of the omnicompetent hero--which Jenny isn't, particularly, but in some ways she's a tweak at it. So, yeah, I retract that comment.

At least he didn't call it Cyberpunk.
Having just read John Varley's Red Thunder, it's very difficult to think of either you or scalzi as being anything like as "neo-Heinlein" as he is.
*g* Have you read Steel Beach? He has a whole society of Heinleinian freeholder types in there.
There is one major difference.

Late Heinlein set all the polyamory and filler on Tertius, the magical world where all sources of plot tension have been cured! Whereas when your characters died they stayed dead.

;;still feels obscurely betrayed by The Cat Who Walks Through Walls::
I can sympathize with the urge to bring beloved characters back from the dead. (There's a few in particular that I hate having killed) fer chrissakes don't publish it....
He seems to say "Heinlein" where I would say "comptent." Rest assured, your characters do not banter at each other like Heinlein characters. (And he always did it. I just reread "Gulf," and that's the part that makes me want to hurl.)
You notice how all Heinlein characters sound alike?
Hmm. I still haven't gotten around to picking up Hammered (mea culpa!), but what I've read about the trilogy doesn't sound at all Heinlein-ian... o.O

First time for everything, I suppose.
i am going to have to pick up scalzi's work at capricon.

my question is, why is being compared to heinlein supposed to be an insult?
He's out of fashion this week.
*blink*

I've read the first and third of your books (I know, but everyone's been out of number two. I will resort to Amazon soon) and just read Old Man's War, and I wouldn't say *either* of you were writing Neo-Heinlein. But then again my view of all Heinlein that is not The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress is a wee bit jaundiced, so what do I know?
I liked large, subversive chunks of Stranger and Evil. I mean, I guess I can see it--John wrote OMW intentionally as a responsorial to Starship Troopers--and yendi pointed out some similarities above...

...well, yanno.

Hey, are you going to be at Boskone? If you are, find me. *g*