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bear by san

March 2017

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bear by san

Scooped

For those of you who can't make it to London this spring, Lis Riba offers an alternative:

"I just found out that the Searching for Shakespeare exhibit at London's National Portrait Gallery which I was whining about yesterday (and first blogged eighteen months ago) will tour to the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven from 24 June-17 September 2006

And the museum's website confirms those dates (well, they actually say from June 23, but close enough):

The exhibition includes nearly 150 works on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Museum of London, the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and a number of private collections, with fifty additional works selected from collections at Yale. It will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue."


That's about an hour from my house. So, ah, truepenny, angevin2, when are you guys coming to crash on my sofa again? arcaedia, ashacat, you guys in?

Comments

I am so cranky about this. I will be in New Haven at the end of April, but ain't no way I can get there again in the summer (doing horse-related very expensive things instead).

You guys better post great trip reports!
Could a Lioness get in on this?

signed,
intrigued
Mi casa etc etc. Also, suricattus is moving to New Haven soonish. So, yanno, your posse awaits.

Readercon is in July.
I shall be in residence, and have a guest sofa. And extra towels, even.

And hrm, I may even be within walking distance of said exhibit...
And here you are coming all this way for it! Oh well, it's not as if there isn't anything else in England you might want to see. ;)

Btw, I'm to the exhibit on Saturday. I will post about it.
ooo. please do.

Hmm. Were you serious about that offer to teach me to drive on the proper side of the road? Because I need to figure out what rail pass to get, you see... and I could get off a *lot* cheaper if I were driving to Stratford and Canterbury and only taking the train into London. (four hundred dollars or so as opposed to nearly a thousand.)
It all depends on time since you arrive on a Monday and I'm working all that week. Will your insurance cover you over here?
It should. I'll double-check.
Okay, just want to make sure of that.

I drive a tiny little VW Lupo. It does have a back seat. ;)

Ian drives a bigger Audi estate (station wagon). If he still has it then. We may replace it because it needs so work done. I don't know if we'll replace it before the trip, though, and it is driveable. The question is is it worth paying a lot to get it through MOT? And the central locking system is shot, but it can be locked by hand.

One of the cars will go to the airport with us.

Oh, and they're both manual transmissions. Most cars here are. You can hire an automatic, but that's more expensive than hiring a manual. (If you take the driving test here on an automatic, you're only licensed to drive automatics.)
I'm pretty comfortable in small cars. And I drive a standard. *g*

You know, essentially, whatever you are comfortable with....
As long as you're insured... :)

Personally, I'm more comfortable driving a small car here -- small, winding, narrow roads and smaller parking places, you know. And I grew up just outside of Philadelphia with narrow, winding roads and I lived in Colorado with narrow, winding roads in the mountains. I drove my friend A's huge Oldsmobile van this weekend and really disliked driving it over here. It's just too darned big for the roads. ;) (Plus, the mileage sucks.)
*g* Amen to that.
Oh, and her van also is an automatic. My foot kept trying to find the clutch... ;)
eee.

What's worst is when you shift with the parking brake...
Trust me, it will take you minutes to get used to the 'wrong' side of the road. I drive on the continent every so often and the first ten minutes are alarming, but then you just shift into following the rest of the traffic and your brain adjusts.

I still spend about half a day opening the door whenever I try to change gear, however.
You are reassuring.

Tell me the foot pedals are in the same order, at least?
From l to r: clutch, brake, accelerator.

I think that's the same. Last time I drove in the States was about 18 months ago and it was a friend's automatic. I don't like 'em, too used to stick shifts.
Yep. That's right. Er, correct. *g*
Yeah, I didn't have any trouble driving in Australia or England. The more dyslexic you are, the easier it is :)
Nuts. I work about five minutes from this, have been to TNPG about twice in the last year, and don't recall it... both times I've rushed a bit, could I have missed it?

Hell, I'm overdue a revisit anyway.
It's a special exhibit that just opened on 2 March.
Thanks, I'll check it out one lunchtime.
Oh, god. I've got to find a way to make it there to see it.
So, you volunteering to organize a group expotition?

My birthday is June 21 and the exhibit opens the 23rd/24th, so my gut reaction is to go that weekend.

However, I've also signed up for the museum's mailing list and sent an email request to get their media notices (haven't heard back yet, but bard_in_boston does come in handy for these things) to find out what kinds of related programming or lectures they might offer to accompany the exhibit. I'll keep folks posted when/if I hear.

[BTW, take a look at their other forthcoming exhibit: sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English diplomatic silver from the Armory Museum of the Moscow Kremlin. Kyool!]
Oh, I don't organize things. *g* I'm abstract sequential: my organization skills end at "herding."

It does look like people may be around in the general vicinity of readercon, though.

I am up for a roadtrip to Yale. It will make me feel better about being in the country for the summer. BTW, Katie's (my sister-in-law) tip on driving in the UK for Yanks: the hardest part is your first turn for the day. If you get that right your golden. But watch out for those round-abouts! She also said that English hedges are useful for diving into when the oncoming public bus passes by (over) your mini. I guess there are uses for hedges...other than for making mazes, of course.